• Uncategorized

What Was The Good Friday Agreement 1998

The agreement was for Northern Ireland to be part of the United Kingdom and remain in place until a majority of the population of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland wished otherwise. If this happens, the British and Irish governments will be “obliged” to implement this decision. In addition to the number of signatories[Note 1], Stefan Wolff identifies the following similarities and differences between the themes discussed in the two agreements:[28] The Good Friday Agreement is the cornerstone of our commitment to peace and stability on the island. It was agreed on 10 April 1998 and was adopted by an overwhelming majority in May 1998 in two referendums in both parts of Ireland. Issues of sovereignty, civil and cultural rights, dismantling of arms, demilitarization, justice and police were at the heart of the agreement. As part of the agreement, the British Parliament repealed the Government of Ireland Act 1920 (which had founded Northern Ireland, divided Ireland and asserted territorial right to the whole of Ireland) and the people of the Republic of Ireland amended Articles 2 and 3 of the Irish Constitution, which asserted a territorial right to Northern Ireland. The vague wording of some so-called “constructive ambiguities”[8] helped ensure the adoption of the agreement and delayed debate on some of the most controversial issues. These include extra-military dismantling, police reform and the standardisation of Northern Ireland. Referendums were held on 22 May 1998 in Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. In Northern Ireland, 71% of voters voted for the deal and 29% voted against it. Although this was an important confirmation, an exit poll for the Sunday Times showed that 96 per cent of Northern Ireland nationalists supported the deal, compared with only 55 per cent of trade unionists. Direct domination of London ended in Northern Ireland when power was formally transferred to the new Northern Ireland Assembly, the North-South Council and the Anglo-Irish Council when the opening decisions of the Anglo-Irish Agreement came into force on 2 December 1999.

[15] [16] [17] Article 4, paragraph 2 of the Anglo-Irish Agreement (the agreement between the British and Irish governments on the implementation of the Belfast Agreement) required both governments to inquire in writing about compliance with the terms of entry into force of the Anglo-Irish Agreement; The latter is expected to come into effect as soon as both notifications are received. [18] The British government has agreed to participate in a televised ceremony at Iveagh House in Dublin, the Irish Foreign Office.


salt and pepper shakers